Tag: Climate change

Global Youth Strike for Climate

#FridaysforFuture

“Even the smallest child can make a BIG difference!”

Nico (10 years-old)

Hello! and thank you for reading my blog.

If you are not familiar with the Youth Strike 4 Climate or my blog please read this and check my other posts.

I’m Nico Roman, but everybody calls me Nico. I’m in year 5 at King’s College School in Cambridge, UK. I’m Co-Chair of our Eco-Council (the first-ever Cambridge School Eco-Council in response to the threat of Climate Change on future generations) and a UNESCO Voices of Future Generations Child Ambassador for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

On March 15, 2019 (the day of the Global Climate Strike) we started gathering at Shire Hall. At 10am, there were speakers from lots of different schools. Any school that wanted to send a speaker up did it!

“It was amazing to see hundreds, even thousands of us there.”

Then, at 10:30 – we marched. It was a longer march than last time (Feb 15, 2019), all along King’s Parade and through the city centre, down to St. Andrews Street, and up to the Guildhall.

The smallest children – including me 🙂 – were in front with the banners, everyone was awear of this – to keep a slow and steady pace – we are great at planning and organising! 😉

At 11:00, we were joined by some supportive University Students, and met at the Guildhall for some more speeches til 11:30am

We had some more skpeakers, one of them was my older brother Jona David, UN Child Author of a brilliant book on climate change (The Cosmic Climate Invention), and some brave kids from different schools demanding the world’s decision makers to take responsibility and solve this climate crisis.

And I also had a message to share with everyone – here is part of it:

“Even the smallest child can make a BIG difference!

Our new eco-council brings together pupils from schools all across Cambridge, to share our concerns, to cooperate, and to speak out!

We are hosting these Youth Strikes for our Climate in Cambridge, because we are petrified. We care about all the kids here locally and worldwide who will be hurt, or even die in typhoons, floods and droughts.

In school, we learn to be kind, to care for others, and to be responsible.

Destroying our whole planet is totally NOT ON.

Maybe our decision-makers need to go BACK TO SCHOOL.”

Nico (10), Co-Chair, Cambridge School Eco-Council and UN Child Ambassador for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Interview – ITV News

I was also interviewed by ITV News – to see other media coverage click here

Join us for April’s Friday for Future in Cambridge (or anywhere!)

Next School Strike for Climate Justice will be on April 12, 2019.

11.00 am – Meet at Shire Hall

11.15 am – Walk to King’s Parade

11.30 am – Lie-down at King’s College

Please wear blue, so it looks like Cambridge is flooding!


The lie-down will be for 11-minutes in front of King’s College to send a message about the floods that could drown the iconic town and University of Cambridge if climate change continues.

We will continue to march UNITED! on April 12 and many times after until we see Climate Justice!

We are going to change the fate of humanity! Are you part of this movement yet?

Child Ambassador for the SDGs Nico Roman co-chairs First Cambridge Schools Eco-Council

Outside Michaelhouse Cafe, in front Nico Roman, 10, King’s School; back row from left are Snaedis Fridriksdottir, 14, of Coleridge School; Ella Hone, 11 and Samaya Hone 18, Chesterton School and Helena Davis, 18, of Hills Road Sixth Form College; Jona David, 13, King’s School; and Junayd Islam, 15, of Parkside School.

First UK school eco-council set up in Cambridge

by Cambridge Independent

Cambridge Schools Eco-Council inaugural meeting, Michaelhouse Cafe, March 9, 2019.
From left are Arthur Pledge, 12; Aarifah Islam,12; Junayd Islam, 15; Ella Hone, 11; Nico Roman, 10; Samaya Hone, 14; Helena Davis, 18; Jona David, 13; Snaedis Fridriksdottir, 14; Tommy Harris, 16. Picture: Mike Scialom

I’ve co-chaired a meeting for the first-ever schools eco-council!! this is our (children) response to the threat of climate change on future generations.

The Cambridge School Eco-Council held its inaugural meeting in the chapel at Michaelhouse Cafe on Saturday (March 9).

The establishment of the eco-council comes after the Schhol Strike on Friday (Feb 15) and ahead of the global school strike for climate on Friday (March 15). For the second time children across Cambridge walk out of school in a bid to speed up the political and economic response to the climate crisis.

Outside Michaelhouse Cafe, back row from left are Snaedis Fridriksdottir, 14, of Coleridge School; Nico Roman, 10, King’s School; Samaya Hone, 14, Chesterton School and Helena Davis, 18, of Hills Road Sixth Form College. Front from left are Jona David, 13, King’s School, Ella Hone, 11, Chesterton School and Junayd Islam, 15, of Parkside School. Picture: Mike Scialom

We -Cambridge pupils- issued a ‘Declaration and Eco-Plan on the Climate Emergency’ this weekend which highlighted the drastic action now required to stabilise climate change.

“If we continue burning fossil fuels, building unsustainable infrastructure and degrading our environment, children like us all over the world will hurt or even die” and outlined action plans on three fronts:

– Schools: To educate about lifestyle choices, adopt an eco-code including “an eco-audit and act on all its recommendations, so that all schools are eco-schools”.

– Town & Country: To “commit to carbon neutrality well before 2030”, to “declare a local climate emergency and mean it”, “support local renewables” and impose carbon taxes “to be spent on carbon sequestration and climate change programmes”.

– Country: to “make national and international transport sustainable”, “stop fossil fuel subsidies”, “start energy rationing” and “change food and agriculture systems”.

Check the full article by Cambridge Independent

Symposium on Protecting the Environment, Honolulu, Hawaii

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In September 2018, I was invited to give a presentation on my role as UN Child Ambassador for the SDGs, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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Speakers photo of the 2018 Symposium on the Role of International Courts in Protecting Environmental Commons

 

I was the only child there, but I think it went quite good. 

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MY BIG PLAN PROTECT OUR OCEANS FOR TINY SEA TURTLES AND ALL LIFE BELOW WATER – By Nico Roman, 9

                                                    By Nico Roman, 9                    

A turquoise sea-turtle hatches beside her siblings in their golden sandy nest. She blinks her jewel eyes. She is just a baby – small, vulnerable and endangered. She has only one chance in 2,500 to survive, a symbol for all life below water if we cannot change our ways. Like sea-turtles, I have lived on Pacific and Atlantic coasts, swimming Baltic, Salish and Caribbean seas. To save this TINY life and all ocean creatures, we need real change, fast.

We Need Oceans Laws and Compliance

Overfishing and illegal fishing must stop. We need new international and national laws to end subsidies. People must only buy sustainably caught seafood (with escape hatches in nets preventing by-catch of turtles) and not endangered species. Waterproof cameras on boats should film tweets and blogs, making citizens act more responsibly. Coast guards, communities and kids can enforce laws on water and land. By law, people will look out for our tiny turtle as she escapes into the sea, starts her migration, and hunts for food to grow.

We Need a Global End to Ocean Rubbish

Dangerous chemicals are polluting our oceans with run-off from fertilizers and pesticides from the land, industrial chemicals, and untreated storm-water. Plastics are collecting in huge islands, hurting sea-turtles, whales and birds. We must end all harmful practices that drive ocean pollution, changing all agriculture and industry so it is clean and healthy. People must reduce, re-use and recycle all waste, cradle-to-grave, especially plastics. This way, pollution won’t poison or strangle our tiny turtle as she swims thousands of kilometres on her migration across the oceans.

We Need New Marine Plans, Protection and Measurement

There are not enough marine protected areas, and many are degraded.  Ecosystems are threatened, like bleaching of coral. Climate change is causing serious impacts. Clear targets and plans must guarantee protection for all threatened marine ecosystems, respecting scientists and communities. Kids clubs and everyone can help, including tourists. With safe zones, and better measurement and on-ground action, we can ensure that our tiny turtle, and all her friends have a safe and resilient home. Our sea turtle, not so tiny now, can return to lay her own eggs in the sand. Her hatchlings will be protected, maybe by teams of children like me, as they start their own journeys.

Even the tiniest child can make a big difference for sea turtles, for our oceans and for our future.